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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)
after 9/11, thousands of people with the opposite of katrina because fema had control. giving up on individuals helping neighbors, local government, that is a serious problem and why we are bankrupt. all the money that will go out, there is no money in the paint and -- bank so they will just borrow and print and centralize the power to be in washington dc part of that is bureaucratic and in sufficient. john: thank you for all you have done to wake people up. but i fear we will not have much convince -- success convincing people we don't need fema. even though government fails part instinct leads us to assume washington has the best. they don't. they fail all the time. fema fails constantly. after hurricane hugo one senator called it bureaucratic jackasses to get the hell out of the way. they said prove it but after hurricane andrew even in your times reported it is unclear who was in charge of the relief ever. mikulski said the response was seen as a disaster itself. they said they would fix it then came hurricane katrina and nobles to thousand people died. fema often got in the
, this storm costs upwards of $50 billion, making it the second costliest storm after katrina. but atlantic city studios are allowed re-entry today. 95 sandy related deaths are reported in the u.s., including two brothers, ages 2 the and 4, and new york city staten island tt he centepicenter of the casu today. many are remaining powerless and they're not homeless, as well. and residents say the response is coming a bit too late. >> every single person on this block lost everything. >> we just want everyone to know that we are hurting down here and we need help immediately. >> msnbc's richard lui is now in staten island with more for us. richard, good morning. >> thomas, very good morning to you. we're right here by the bay. several marinas in staten island and this corner has been hurt so much. if you lived in this area, you would have 30, 40-foot tall yachts sitting in your front yard. i was speaking with representative michael grim a little earlier. this is his district. and i asked him about the shelters. where are people going and what do they need? this is what he told me. >> they need
business bureau. fraud was so rampant in the wake of hurricane katrina in 2005 the government created a disaster fraud team which is said to have prosecuted nearly 1,500 people involved with running scams related to katrina and rita. meanwhile, countless americans are opening their wallets to victims of the superstorm. about $11.4 million so far has been donated to the red cross, two days after the storm. that's more than the $8 million donated after hurricane isaac. a music telethon dedicated to sandy and led by bruce springsteen, bon jovi and billy joel will air on nbc tonight. climate change failed to become a major headline story in the presidential election... until now. in the aftermath of hurricane sandy, new york mayor michael bloomberg noted the summer drought, melting ice caps and rising temputures as reasons to take action on climate change. then on thursday in a stunning move, bloomberg endorsed president obama, citing his record on climate change issues such as raising fuel emissions standards. meanwhile, gop vice presidential candidate paul ryan suggests taking another
and disasters i'm absolutely confronted by these two americas, the katrina/fema reaction and the sandy/fema reaction and the reality is to argue there hasn't been a significant political response to the significance of fema by different governments and it's not split down party lines. it's simply not true. there was a really great article in "mother jones" that took you through -- >> the development of fema competence. >> right. and who had headed fema and the way that presidents had appointed those fema heads were directly related to how they perceived their significance. so, for example, george bush actually allocated michael brown who was the former -- i just had to read this out, because i was just blown away. michael brown who was the former commissioner of judges and stewards for the international arabian horse association, that's who headed fema. clinton was the first -- was the first president to allocate the fema head who actually had experience -- >> disaster. >> -- disaster management. it's not political. it's about poverty. it's about race. and when we think about disaster
up in flames and four other houses. >> we think back about katrina and what a big impact that was on our country, we rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm, we think of the aftermath. right now we're in the aftermath period in terms of sandy. tell me how you feel about that. and before we get to rebuilding, people taking care of continuing damage right now, how do you assess the coordination between the state, federal, and local municipalities? >> i think we're doing very well. i think the president's response has been terrific, really. it's been coordinated unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard governor christie, who is a republican with president obama working together, and that's how it's been from the president, to the governor, to the counties and the towns. one of the things that i did today was talk to fema about trying to get an office and staff person in various parts of the district today, and they're working on it, and with the money that comes to downs for recovery to rebuild board walks or municipal buildings, i t
-- for hurricane isaac and hurricane katrina seven years ago -- both hit, i want to point out here both hit during the week of the homosexual event called southern decadence in new orleans. >> this makes me a bad homo, but i have never even heard of southern decadence. >> it sounds cool. >> we let the straights in. >> i'm in. >> bill: how big of you. >> what it is is that we have a hot line to god, and we're pulling the strings behind the scenes. >> bill: i got it. you know zap him. there are four important ballot measures on the ballot this year, dealing with marriage equality, maryland maine, washington state is the -- well they are all big. >> yeah. >> bill: and then minnesota. what is the difference? >> minnesota's is a constitutional -- anti-gay constitution issue. that would ban it. the other ones are affirmative, right? to maryland and washington both passed in the state legislature marriage equal this year but then anti-gay folks got enough signatures to get enough signatures to put it on the ballot. in maine it was sort of a heart breaker. so everybody is real c
a comparison with hurricane katrina. i want to use it as an analogy. but the analogy here that might be helpful, we think back to katrina and what that meant to us as a nation. we very rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm. right now we are in the aftermath period of this superstorm, sandy. how do you feel in terms of dealing with the aftermath, describing those explosions, these ongoing worries. before we get to rebuilding, rescuing people, taking care of continuing damage right now. how would you assess the response and the coordination between the federal government, the state government, municipalities. how are we doing? >> i think we're doing very well. i mean, you heard the president, and i have to say that i think his response has been terrific, really. and it's been coordinated, unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard, you know, governor christie, who's a republican, with president obama, working together. and that's how it's been, from the president to the governor, all the way down to the county and the towns. so one of the things that i di
, some are now drawing comparisons between this superstorm and katrina. so just how do they measure up? cnn meteorologist severe weather expert chad myers is taking a closer look. he's joining us now. how do they measure up, chad? >> well, first of all, the storm surge with katrina was enormous. almost three times more of a wave or of a surge with katrina as bay st. louis was about 28 feet. manhattan island, downtown, the battery, had about 9.5 feet. haven't seen too many numbers higher than that. 9.5 feet moving into the city comparing to moving into the bay, obviously there's a town there and all the way do biloxi, it's the population density in new york city that is going to -- and in new jersey and connecticut, that is going to put this way up in the record books. katrina, $145 billion in damage. andrew, this is cost for adjusted inflation $43.5 billion. and looks like somewhere sandy will fall somewhere between katrina and into andrew. so probably number two on the scale for dollar damage. now, when it comes to deaths, it's disturbing, wolf, to see and hear how quickly the fatalit
and there is a lot of suffering this is our hurricane katrina. we really felt like we were being ignored. the rest of the country was seeing something, but it wasn't us. that dramatically started to chan yesterday and certainly today with secretary napolitano coming, the national ceo of the red cross. >> no doubt. the boots will stop hitting the ground, whether it is the red cross and fema. fema was knocking on doors. [talking over each other] neil: what were they doing when they were knocking on doors? >> giving people desperately needed information and letting them know wat the processes and there were inspectors looking at how to assees the damage to the people can start to get some funding so they can start replacing in putting together their lives. going door-to-door is tremely important. a lot of things that happened today that, you know, need desperately to be done. we are still hurttng. it is a tremendous amount to be done. there are a lot of people are looking for answers and still haven't been gone through. the only backslapping that there should be at all is from the volunteers of the s
katrina devastated new orleans, it seems all the relevant agencies were ready this time, up to speed, especially fema, the federal emergency management agency, that was criticized in 2005 being widely lauded now. the president himself was up all night from monday to tuesday in the situation room in the white house monitoring the situation. now he is touring the disaster areas, especially in new jersey, so he seemed very much concerned and seemed to do everything he could to help the people. he has been applauded even by republican competitors for this. one of his harshest critics has always been new jersey governor chris christie, and this man said that obama was doing an outstanding job. >> elections are right around the corner next week, and campaigns have resumed. it is a difficult question to ask, but who has actually profited from the situation? >> for mitt romney, it is a difficult situation because national disaster times are times when politics are supposed to be put aside, so campaigning too early might hurt him, but it is the only thing he can do because he does not have an
area to get the water out. they are sending in an unwatering team after hurricane katrina in illinois. bringing in pumps from the navy. here is a perfect reason why here at battory park we have the battery tunnel park full of water. it is unbelievable looking at this. some subways will start north of 34th street. 5 and a half million people ride the subway every day here. transportation authority says every day the subway system is closed it costs about $18 million in revenue. 18,000 flights have been grounded. it will take days before it is back to normal. new york's three major airports are expected to be open with limited flights. both from laguardia airport will be starting at 7:00 a.m. 3 occupants or more will have to be in the car to go over the east bridges. it is to help out a huge traffic problem going on around the city. there has been a gas shortage as well as you can image. the drivers literally are running out of gas because they can't fill the reservations they already have. >>> at that time pee ann the new york stock exchange is going to be opening once again today. ye
, there is debris everywhere but there isn't just devastation. this is an katrina that watch everything away. these buildings still exist. there is a heck of a clean up here to do but this can come back. a little worse down the beach in seaside heights and atlantic city but it will come back but look. look at this debris. junk everywhere. this is going to take a while. this is the roof of the tiki bar which is 300 yards up the beach. this was the roof of it and that is deposited here. i leave you with this shot at the atlantic ocean. it occurred to me today that as i look out there it is almost like nothing happened. the ocean is saying i was upset but i am calm now. i may not stay calm forever but you are good for while. connell: that pictures of beautiful and to come back to the isolation is jarring. what stood out to you today? today is the first day you had a chance to walk around the. >> exactly. the first sunny day. the first real nice day. you hit it exactly right. the contrast in the devastation and the beauty. this is typically what we see after hurricane. took a couple extra days b
the florida coast. we got a lot of their grain from katrina. but all of the storms before, we were affected by many of those. we are 100 miles and the coast. you know what i am saying it? i think it is global warming. it could be other things and stuff. but the way the pollution and stuff is affecting the world -- there you can see different changes and stuff. that is what i want to say. host: this also from the wall street journal about transportation. riders took a 5 billion trips and public systems and washington, d.c., philadelphia, boston, jersey and the greater new york city area. scena. go ahead. caller: i am living in new york. and this is an economy issue. i am looking across the street and new jersey is deadlocked. i look downtown and it is blacked out. all of these people cannot go to work today. their businesses are closed. there are people scrambling. my friends are calling and asking where can i get food? this is a big issue. $20 billion is easily going to be the cost of this. it is all about the economy. we can get more than enough energy. and you wouldn't be facing climate c
with katrina, if the federal response is sluggish or looks unprepared for this, that's a worse damage to the president than anything else, and i think that the president has to do this. he's canceled four events in four states over the next two days. right now he's scheduled to go to green bay at the end of the tuesday. we'll see if that happens. probably unlikely. he may start again on wednesday when he's supposed in ohio. >> although to his benefit you could argue in some of the key states, places like new york and new jersey and connecticut, they're very strong governors there who are experienced with this stuff and unlikely to fumble the response. we'll see how that goes. let's bring in congresswoman marcia blackburn, a republican from tennessee. what impact do you think this storm will have to the presidential race? >> i'm not certain that it's going to have any direct impact. i will say that our thoughts and prayers are definitely with everyone and with the elected officials that are dealing with this response, with the emergency responders. i think that one of the things that p
. that's allstate's stand. are you in good hands? megyn: after katrina hit the gulf coast everybody wanted water and ice. after sandy the hot commodity is gasoline. some people driving 50 miles just to fill up the tank. >> reporter: a travel catch-22. you have roads being opened, you have gas stations in most cases that are not open. and the reason they are not open is gas stations need power to pump the fuel and across the tristate area there is very little power to go around. many have likened this to the gas crunch of the 1970s. remember the long lines? people lining up to fill up. there are 200 cars long, the lines to get gasoline in some cases to fill these things up. they are trying to get gas to run their generators because they don't have power antigen rayer toes burn between 4-5 gallons per hour. that's why people are on foot. there are also people filling up their cans to fill up their cars. >> if you drive around in circles you will run out much gas owner. sitting in line in the truck it burns 5 gals. >> reporter: the gas stations are worried about their gas supply being
company is forensic weather consultants and i've worked on a lot of hurricane related cases, katrina, hurricane wilma and ike, for the insurance companies, and also, for the attorneys and home owners pan one thing that is most difficult is the flood insurance, and when most people buy home owners insurance policy it covers wind and that alone doesn't cover flood. so, place that is didn't have flood insurance may not be able to collect from their insurance policy. so, it's much easier to collect and get insurance coverage for wind storm related events. even though, a lot of the insurance companies have what they call a wind storm deductible, which means, whether it's a named storm such as a hurricane, when it makes landfall or not, will determine what percentage of the deductible, the home owner has to pay. >> and howard, tom sullivan here, you jumped on point i was going to make about how flood insurance is, two parts about it, one, i used to have a home years ago, that was in a flood plain, designated as such. so, i had to have flood insurance, but even that, the flood insurance was
for katrina victims. it was so detached from reality. that empathy gap. he doesn't have the judgment or the experience or the heart, i don't know what it is to really know what's needed. you get up there. you can campaign for the red cross and ask for donations but even i knew when he did it, it was a ridiculous thing to do. >> he didn't have to do it in ohio at the site of a campaign. >> excellent point. just happen to go to a swing state. >> if chris christie can put aside any political calculation why can't the leader of the republican party? you mean to tell me the only people that got devastated by the storm are people that are going to vote for barack obama? if he wants to be the leader of the free world he's got to get face to face with the people going through the devastation to snow it. >> he should answer questions about the fema policy which is so obvious that he needs to explain what he meant in that debate. he took -- i think he avoided 14 questions or something like that on the fema policy which is inappropriate. >> he's walking into a storm. good to have you with us. >
in lives and economic damage might be less than katrina. i know our insurance analyst has talked about the size of the liability being half, which is good news. and i think there's going to be some affect on auto sales and consumer retail spending. but, again, if those stocks take a dip, that's going to be a pretty big opportunity. because we know when you have to fix a broken window you end up with more spending. overall, this could be a boost to the economy. i think it's going to be viewed as an opportunity. i think we're seeing in some of the premarket activity. >> i never know really whether to believe that or not. i see with insurance companies and i've seen the case made, the broken window case that you eventually have to fix it. net net, replacing things that may have been -- didn't need replacing and using capital to do that, i can't believe that, you know, spending $20 billion on what you didn't have to do before can be net net be good long-term. is that really true? is that the case that economists make? >> well, i think it depends on how much credit is involved. in other wor
katrina. mark, you worked in fema also. what is the fema response in a situation like this now when there's multiple states to respond to at the same time? >> good evening, lawrence. fema's mission is to support the state and local governments when it exceeds their capacity. an event like this it becomes that much more challenging. fema has the capacity, ten regions they can draw resources from around the nation and bring them to bear where they're much needed. in the case of this storm fema has leaned forward and prepositioned those resources in chose states. they've been there for days before the storm making landfall. >> what are common mistakes made in situations like this? >> well, the common mistakes are not understanding what the needs of the state and locals are. getting out in front and not having good lines of communication. i think what you've seen in the past in some of the disasters that have been portrayed as failing is because you didn't have that good, clean, crisp lines of communication you're seeing now. when you hear governors like governor christie stand up and say tha
thing about what you said about the national feeling here. when katrina happened, i got a call the day after from haley barbour, the republican governor from mississippi, who of course, is a friend of mine. and he said, i need guardsmen. can you send me guardsmen? pennsylvania had, you know, nickel on that dime. we're thousands, hundreds of miles away from the gulf, but we have 20,000 guardsmen and i activated 2,100 and sent them down to mississippi and louisiana. and the interesting thing is, i got tons of letters from citizens of those states thanking me, but i also got letters from my own guardsmen, who said it was the best thing they've done since they've been in the national guard, to help americans from another area of the country, who are suffering. and that's the spirit that takes over and it's, as you said, what makes us a special place. >> well, that's why people like you and they like haley barbour, thank you, governor rendell, and thank you, david corn. you don't get to be a governor, you don't know what that's like. and for the latest on the devastation on the jersey shore
. >> he would have said more but he was still responding to katrina. >> you will be rescued by private sector volunteers like paul ryan who will come to your devastated town and wash your already clean pots. >> bell go trick-or-treating on the same route i went on when i was a little guy. >> i usually put a condom over my head and go out as a -- never mind. >> he's not going to get any of your votes. >> far left is threatening violence if president obama loses the election. >> we voted him off the island. >> five more days. >> together we will renew those bonds and reaffirm that spirit that makes the united states of america the greatest nation on earth. >>> let's get right to our panel now, krystal ball is my colleague and the co-hass host of "the cycle." jimy williams joining us from washington. we have live pictures of president obama speaking in northern new jersey. isn't this what a disaster like this required, a state governor to communicate and then cooperate with the president of the united states? >> it's absolutely what's required, and i think it is what americans want from t
went through katrina in mississippi says that's absolutely what governor christy ought to say, he is doing what he has to do and get off his back. and you have the underground voices of the romney campaign who were taking a different tack and kind of sniping at christie at different angles, in a fit of pique basically. >> you can't really blame them. this is game theory. you choose a, i choose b. if my guy looks like he is helping you, even if he is not truly helping you, and appearance has a tendency to be a reality, i don't blame the romney folks for being a little piqued or po'ed. >> you may not blame them, but for showing it. some of the conservatives who backed governor romney showing that they were quite irritated with this and rather take the high road, knowing that all eyes are on this storm and the response. so marc, looking at these numbers, 73% of the folks in ohio, who already approved the bailout and now approve the president's response to sandy, what do we make of that when you couple it with the chris christie hug heard around the world it seems. we can't stop talki
hit by hurricane katrina. he talks a lot about small businesses, still talks about it. says i'm a business guy, i know about small businesses. massachusetts when he was governor ranked 48th in small business creation. and one of the two states that ranked lower was louisiana that had gotten hit by hurricane katrina. so this is a guy who has a track record of saying one thing and doing something else. on the other hand -- on the other hand, when i ran four years ago, i made promises, too. i promised to cut taxes for middle class families. and i did. by $3,600. i promised to cut taxes for small business owners. and i did, 18 times. i promised to end taxpayer funded wall street bailouts, and we have. and by the way, we got every dime worth of money we used for the bank rescue, and we got interest with it, too. i promise to take on those financial institutions that were charging too much for student loans, and we were able to make college more affordable for millions of americans. i promised i would never walk away from the millions of jobs that were in jeopardy when the auto indu
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)

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